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Battery Charging

Discussion in 'Android Questions' started by Alkali, May 30, 2013.

  1. Alkali

    Bronze

    Dec 17, 2010
    1

    Sponsored Ad

    My dear Friends,
    Anybody out there with a similar problem? It takes forever to fully charge my new Htc One roughly 5 to 6 hrs. Is this normal?
     
  2. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Using what kind of charger? Is it the OEM charger that came with the unit?
     
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  4. Alkali

    Bronze

    Dec 17, 2010
    1
    Exactly Stevetaz. Out of the box.
     
  5. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    If it takes 5-6 hours to charge your phone from say 20% to 100% I wanted to say something is wrong. However, looking around I am finding this to be a common comment/complaint about the HTC One and it appears it may relate to their design. Not sure if it is really 5-6 hours though. I am seeing that 4-5 from almost depleted to full charge is not unusual.

    What is interesting is that it will go from almost 0% to 85-90% in under 3 hours. The last 10% can take up to an additional 2 hours!

    Here is a very interesting article that includes specific information about the battery life and mentions the excessive charging time. The charging info is at the end of the page.

    You might want to check and see what the phone is doing while it is charging. Is it syncing, do you have background apps running? Is it connected to FaceBook, Twitter, etc?

    Try a test by turning off the phone when it is at about 20% and time how long a full charge takes. Then do the same with it on to compare.

    Remember you should NOT run LiIon batteries below 20% as that can damage the battery and shorten the usable life of it. If it happens once in a while that won't kill it, but don't do it on a regular basis.
     
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  6. Krunk83

    Krunk83 New Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    1
    I've read that the HTC One takes it's sweet time charging. So this may be normal.
     
  7. Alkali

    Bronze

    Dec 17, 2010
    1
    I will as stevetaz suggested and see what happens.

    Sent from my HTC One using Everything Android
     
  8. Alkali

    Bronze

    Dec 17, 2010
    1
    I have done charging with 20% and it took just three to get fully charged and will try to charge full with the device On to see.
     
  9. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Most lithium ion batteries switch to trickle charging at 80%. The difference in charging times between empty and 80 and 80 to 100 should be considered normal and not surprising.
     
  10. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Steve-do you have a reference for that 20% statement. I have heard that many times and it is bandied about as fact, but you don't see it (at,least I don't) in print. It seems to be a commom misconception and any articles that actually reference it are circa 2009 from what I've seen. Batteries have improved since then.
     
  11. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Admittedly the 20% I advocate is, in my opinion, a safe threshold that has served me well for many years. I believe the absolute that is published is to never let LiIon batteries drop to 0%. I like to make sure there is a margin for error.

    Most (all?) smartphones have smart batteries that are supposed to shut down when their battery has been drained to critical level. I believe that varies from 7% to 10% depending on the manufacturer.

    That said I always want to have a margin to allow for variables and I like the 20%, which provides a safety margin if I happen to be out and about and unable to charge soon. A phone shutting down by itself is not something I want to have happen.

    I do know several people who loved to run their battery down to the point of shutdown and guess what? Their batteries did not even last one year when it could not hold a charge. One didn't even make it six months of battery life.

    Do what works for you and as always, YMMV.....
     
  12. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    And don't forget that if you shut down your phone with a very low charge and leave it for a few days, the battery continues to drain so just because it had 10% doesn't mean it holds that because LiIon batteries have a discharge rate even when not in use. It is much better than older technology batteries, but it is still there.

    I can't imagine leaving my phone for a few days, but some may....

    LiIon batteries have a safety circuit that when the low-voltage threshold is reached it shuts down the ability to charge essentially making it a dead and unrecoverable battery. I am not sure if that level is 0, 1, 2, 3, etc. I don't want to find out.
     
  13. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Steve--all of what you say is true and I wasn't "fighting" you on it. I was just curious as to if you had any references on the 20% aspect.

    Information I have seen is to allow a deep discharge approx once a month to recalbrate the software component that understands what the bottom level of the battery is.

    That being said, all battieries, including lithium ion have finite lives, require care for optimal performance, etc. Lithium ion batteries have different discharge rates at different termperatures. something that I didn't know that I recently read on Ars was that LI batteries count discharge cycles differently. Discharging from 100 to 80 5 times is actually 1 discharge cycle.

    I agree with what you say...YMMV. There are dozens of ways to tweak battery life, but it's likely that if you hold on to a smartphone for a while, you'll need to replace the battery with a fresh one, before you replace the phone.

    That may not apply to some folks here, who replace smartphones like some people go through underwear <G>
     
  14. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    the other thing to remember that is true of LI batterieis, regardless of how you treat them is that their ultimate capacity diminishes as the discharge cycle count increases. There's no restoring that loss, hence, the inevitable "Damn it, I have to get a new battery for this phone" moment.
     
  15. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Never thought you were fighting me.

    Everything I have seen specifically states to NEVER deep cycle LiIon batteries. Here is one reference:
    • Unlike NiCad batteries, lithium-ion batteries should be charged early and often. However, if they are not used for a longer time, they should be brought to a charge level of around 40%. Lithium-ion batteries should never be "deep-cycled" like NiCd batteries.
    As I stated prior there is a protection circuit in LiIon batteries that if evoked will open the circuit making the battery impossible to charge again. Deep cycling would certainly bring a user close to that "low point". Problem is there will be no warning if approached. You will simply be unable to charge again.As

    Temperature is indeed critical with LiIon batteries. High temperatures will kill them and that is why there have been issues with laptops. Confined space and often not enough ventilation spells disaster for the battery. I believe 77 degrees (F) is the reference ideal and as the temp rises the battery life suffers.
    As a person who does hold on to phones for more that a year or two I agree with what you say about having to change the battery, but that is where I am irritated by the manufacturers going to non-replaceable batteries. LiIons can lose up to 20% of their capacity each year so if you lose 40% of the charging capacity after two years you aren't going to be terribly happy.
     
  16. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    yeah...I think here is information disparity out there. And we all know it's true, 'cuz we read it on the Internet, even if article 1 says something diamtrically opposite of article 2.
     
  17. TarekElsakka

    Bronze

    Oct 27, 2012
    1
    I just got the HTC One today and I can definitely confirm this. It does take a lot of time to charge, I just hope it'll take a long time to drain as well. lol
     
  18. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Tarek, if you think of it post your charging results a couple of weeks or even a month from now to see if it actually charges a bit faster and drains a bit slower........
     
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  19. TarekElsakka

    Bronze

    Oct 27, 2012
    1
    So for so good, in all honesty. Compared to what I used to get on the S3, this is a huge improvement, but I am starting to thinking maybe there was something wrong with my S3, or at least the overheating depleted the battery rather quickly whereas that doesn't seem to happen with the One - it actually cools down from like 45c to 29 in a matter of minutes.
     
  20. kadeshweb

    kadeshweb New Member

    Aug 29, 2013
    0
    It's depend upon your usability.
    Thanks.
     
  21. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    What does that mean?
     

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