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Battery Question

Discussion in 'Android Questions' started by ShortyJ13, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. ShortyJ13

    ShortyJ13 New Member

    Nov 16, 2009
    0

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    This is my first Smartphone, I have always just had normal phones like my LG Envy. I absolutely love the Droid, it is absolutely amazing.

    I have a question about charging the battery. With my old phones the battery held a charge and lasted much longer if I let it go till it shut off then charged it. And I know you had to make sure you charges it to "full" so it would work to its full potential. Does this same hold true with the Droid battery? I was told these were new batteries and they had no "battery memory", and that you could charge it whenever you wanted and for however long also. I want to do whatever is best for the battery so that I am not dumping money down the drain replacing them constantly.

    Any help is much appreciated, thank you :dft010:big_smile
     
  2. Eugene

    Bronze

    Jul 30, 2007
    0
    There never was any "battery memory", very early nicads exhibited a memory effect because they acted like they had a memory, but even then it was not really that bad. Lithium Ion has no memory like characteristics and they also have the lowest number of charge/discharge cycles, typically around 300, so if you run it all the way down all the time it will wear out quicker.
    Now I bet what someone was trying to tell you with your old phone was to run it down all the way every so often to calibrate the battery meter. You really can't tell how much charge a battery as left in it except as a battery is depleted its voltage will start to drop, this may be as small as a few milli or micro volts but there will be a small drop over the discharge. So the battery gauge records this voltage until the battery is dead, saves that info and then as the battery is used compares the voltage with the table it saved to estimate the amount of charge.
    But the issue then is, first every charge/discharge cycle the battery holds slightly less and eventually around 300 cycles will reach the 80% mark where its considered worn out, and second a lithium ion battery looses 10-20% of its capacity per year no matter how its used. So with use or even as time goes by the battery capacity is less so the battery meters estimation will be slightly high. So you run the phone all the way dead and battery meter resets its table for the new length of time where it dropped to minimum voltage.
     
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  4. ranjo105

    Bronze

    Nov 29, 2009
    0
    I read that Lithiums do NOT like to be deep discharged. Early ni-cads, how about all of them. You charge them up after using a small percentage of their power consistently and then you only can use them for that amount before they go dead. This is after experiencing that phenomena across many many devices with many many batteries. Lithiums do not display that "memory" effect. However, they are only good for so many discharge-charge cycles.
     
  5. Eugene

    Bronze

    Jul 30, 2007
    0
    Be careful with your wording, there are lithium batteries, they are not rechargeable, lithium ion or lithiom polymer (Lion or LiPo) are the rechargeables. Shortening the wording here gives a completely different meaning.
    The phones voltage cut off will prevent fully discharging the battery anyway, when the phone says 0 and shuts off the battery still has some power left in it, its just that the voltage is too low now to be of use. Any "smart" device is like that, its using "dumb" devices like (incan) flashlights or kids toys with no low voltage shutoff that can completely discharge a cell to 0v. The danger isn't in discharging to 0, its that when there are multiple cells in a pack one can reach 0v before the rest and then the voltage from them can reverse the polarity of the one at 0.
     
  6. ranjo105

    Bronze

    Nov 29, 2009
    0
    I stand corrected, but ni-cads and their cousin nickel metal hydride suck.
     
  7. Eugene

    Bronze

    Jul 30, 2007
    0
    Try the new low self discharge NiMH, Sanyo Eneloop, Rayovac hybris, duracell precharged. I switched to eneloops a couple years ago for our digicams and get close to lithium battery life and since they don't self discharge like a nicad or traditional nimh they are always ready when we need them.
    You also need a decent charger, there are far too many out there that either charge in pairs or charge too fast or charge too slow.
     
  8. ranjo105

    Bronze

    Nov 29, 2009
    0
    You are talking about a specialized application. You get a portible phone for the home with ni-cads is what I am talking about. Talk for 5-10 minutes and re-charge it by putting the phone back in the cradle a number of times and the batteries will let you down when you need to talk for 1 hour.
     
  9. Eugene

    Bronze

    Jul 30, 2007
    0
    The main issue with most portable phones like that is they overcharge the batteries. They are a simple trickle charger that always charges when the phone is on the cradle. This got worse when they started putting NiMH in those type of phones/chargers because NiMH are even less tolerant of overcharging, so they kill the batteries pretty quick. They are getting better though, we had a set of phones that did shut off the charging once the battery was charged, but one of the bases quit turning off so it would overcharge the phone that was on it and eventually killed the batteries.
    I just bought a new set of phones that instead of the little shrink wrapped battery pack they have individual NiMH AAA's. So I can pull those out and test/condition them on my good charger.
    Most NiMH problems are due to the chargers, those simple trickle chargers which overcharge or those 15minute battery cookers.
     

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