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Does S-voice have to be on to voice answer a call?

Discussion in 'Android Questions' started by EQBob, Nov 14, 2013.

  1. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30

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    This is confusing me. I can certainly voice answer a call...or wave answer a call with s-voice on. But it doesn't work with it off, despite under settings, having the phone set to answer on voice.

    I can certainly understand if S-voice is required...the directions just don't seem to make that clear...at least to me.
     
  2. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    The way this page from the manual is written it would seem to be saying s-voice is on:
    "In combination with using S Voice if the...."

    Use of the phrase "In combination with" certainly indicates to me that feature should be on. I don't have time to search too much, but let us know if you find anything else to clarify.....
     
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  4. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Thanks. I appreciate the help. Appreciate the link to the manual as well. If you paid $800 for the damn phone, you'd think they would give you a cd with the freaking manual on it.. Or maybe even a piece of paper with a link to the online location. Nope.

    S voice worked pretty well today during my 6.5 hours on the road (big difference for me since I'm normally on the road 15 minutes to work and back (g)). I voice answered a couple of calls and it read me text message from. My wife and I voice dictated some back. Overall, unless I was pulled off for a few minutes, I kept off the damn thing. 75 mph and reduced lane widths in construction zones and upwards of 40% trucks and phone use is a highly dangerous combination.

    I can never seem to get the volume high enough on speakerphone for what I want. My truck is 2001 so it doesn't have a BT enabled system. Only 73k miles on it and the automatic door locks no longer work, but engine, body, and the rest of the stuff is in perfect shape.-so I'm not buying anything new anytime soon (g). Although I do know what I will get when I get it (g)
     
  5. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
  6. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    That's the biggest mistake I made when buying my after market XM radio several years ago. Not getting it BT enabled.
     
  7. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    And I can't even be a probe vehicle in the data stream now...(g). At least not with BT. The phones are regardless of user's desires.
     
  8. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    So buy a new radio. Cheaper than a truck.....:D

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Everything Android mobile app
     
  9. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Lol...quite true. My glasses were a higher need,...they came in at 1300
     
  10. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    And actually with WiFi sensing now hitting the sensor market, there's no way of escaping much probing at all
     
  11. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Do you mean like this?
     
  12. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    No. I mean sensing wifi enabled devices as probe vehicles in the data stream.
     
  13. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    No clue what that means.....

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Everything Android mobile app
     
  14. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Cellphones and mobiles devices and cars are used as anonymous probes in the data stream. Many companies buy the billions of points of data generated by your cell phone as it reports in to towers during the day. Thousands of uses of that data.

    One of them is in the transportation world. That data can be used to determine heading, speed, travel time, and in some cases, even lane positioning. However, it's expensive.

    Another data source relies on a more local sensing of the devices. BT is the main way in which this has been done. If BT is in discoverable mode, as it passes a sensor, it "reports in". Match a report at two different sensors and you have date, time, travel time, and heading.

    As phones are produced with BT no in discoverable mode or people turn it off to conserve battery power, other probe options have been investigated. The one that's rolling out is WiFi--because virtually every phone searches for WiFi.
     
  15. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Thanks for the detail....

    Only if it is on......
     

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