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GSIII rumors to have wireless charging

Discussion in 'Android Questions' started by rom x, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. rom x

    Bronze

    Jun 27, 2011
    4

    Sponsored Ad

    After a handful of Galaxy S III rumors over the weekend… it’s time for yet another one. Like all rumors, take this as a grain of salt. According to the Korean site DDaily, they have it on good authority that Samsung’s “secret weapon” in their upcoming Galaxy S III is that the device will come standard with wireless charging capabilities out of the box. If that doesn’t sound too killer just wait.
    Unlike current wireless charging solutions which must have a capable device almost touching the surface of the charging pad, Samsung’s proprietary patented offering will allow for wireless charging anywhere from 1 to 2 meters away from the base. Now, that would be something.
    It’s kind of strange how we haven’t seen a more widespread adoption of the wireless charging standard, but once Samsung makes the jump, I wouldn’t be surprised if we start seeing it on more devices in the future. What do you guys think? Would wireless charging on the Galaxy S III make the device even more desirable?
     
  2. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    I am quite interested in the charging technology as I can't understand how that could work without health risks. Isn't 2 meters a bit over 6' or 6.5'? I can't imagine how this works. Wouldn't that create an electromagnetic field?

    If true it could be very exciting. I hope to see more....
     
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  4. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Yes-any inductive charging takes place via an electromagnetc field. However, it would just be one of hundreds that you encounter daily. Light is essentially an electromagnet field, radio waves, cell phones, wifi, gamma radiation from space, etc. Electromagnetic fields are everywhere.

    Wireless charging is accomplished via inductive charging. If you have an electric toothbrush, you almost undoubtably use inductive charging. Basically one coil in the chargine base generates a field and another coil in the device sits inside the field and therefore can transfer a small current.

    If the distance aspect is true, presumably they're using the concept of resonance coupled with inductive charging. Adding in resonance principles essentitally makes the charging fields "directional" to a device resonating at the same frequency. Without resonance, the field just spreads in all directions and would get quite large. I think it was MIT that discovered and demonstrated the resonance principle circa 2007 to a distance of up to 2 meters.

    Give it 10 more years (maybe less?) and lamps won't have wires, etc. Everything will be a resonant inductive charge from a base socket on the outside wall of a room. Devices will standardize on a resonance frequency and will charge automatically when within range.
     
  5. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    Bob, thanks for the thorough explanation.

    I feel safer already.....
     
  6. rom x

    Bronze

    Jun 27, 2011
    4
    mee two:)
     
  7. sofaking

    Bronze

    Feb 27, 2012
    0
    Doubt this will work, ever.
    Think about it. How does your battery charge? It plugs into a circuit, and is charged with amps, and volts, and watts.
    If you pull it off the circuit, or isn't even part of it, how can it get "juice"? You can't turn electrical energy into air and then put it in your phone (back into electrical) :p
    Think of it logically!
     
  8. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Hmmmm. You've apparently never heard of a guy named Tesla? The concept has only been proven since 1891 when he first demonstrated it. Might find some interesting reading here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla
     
  9. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    And just to clarify what may be a point for confusion, you're not turning electricty into air, you're transmitting electrical energy (electromagnetic fields) through the air. Same thing you do for radio, TV, WiFi, and hundreds of other examples.
     
  10. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    To be fair Bob, when you use examples like radio, TV and WiFi these are not what people think of when they think of power. The radio does indeed get signals that are broadcast, but for it to play the stations the unit is either plugged into the wall or running on batteries installed inside the device.

    Getting used to the idea electric current can flow through the air and reach a particular device to recharge it is a bit Star Trekkie to most folks. We were raised to fear and respect electricity that runs through wires in our houses as it can be dangerous as well as beneficial. Now that power can run through the air as we walk around and through it? Very different......
     
  11. sofaking

    Bronze

    Feb 27, 2012
    0
    I agree.
    I'm not scared of electricity around us. But if it's flowing SOMEHOW in the air, I'd feel uncomfortable, health risks, etc.
    I just don't see it as a reality.
    It's different with say, iDevices abilities to sync wireless, that's transferring data, or transmitting radio waves.
    These features
    that consumes power.

    What does Tesla prove that makes this possible.

    I'd understand if say, you plug an adapter into a wall, and it somehow heats up, transmit the heat waves (your phone would have to be above it, in a closed environment), then the heat somehow spins a wheel in your phone, which makes the mechanical energy that is converted into electrical energy. This idea is crazy (mine), but I'd see that as more of a possibility than the OP.

    Can someone explain it then :p W.O sarcasm :p I'm not as old/educated as you others. :)
     
  12. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    Sure...I understand. And I wasn't trying to be particularly snarky about it. Just pointing out that the "it'll never work", has worked, for more than 100 years. There's disbeleif and then there's refusing to believe even when it exists today. We all think of electricty as different, but it really is just a field. It flows through the air now for things like toothbrushes, charging pads, etc. Now hey're just going to make the air gap much bigger.

    And I understand the respect part...Scares the hell out of me even changing a light switch in my house!
     
  13. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    I apologize if my attemps to be lighthearted came across as heavier than intended sarcasm. I was being a little sarcastic to be sure, but in play, not attempting to berate. Sorry if that didn't come across.

    Best thing I can suggest is to look at your electric tooothbrush, if you have one. That uses inductive charging. Has nothing to do with heat. Heat may be a by-product of an inefficient transfer, but the transfer itself has nothing to do with it.

    More later...meetings call....
     
  14. sofaking

    Bronze

    Feb 27, 2012
    0
    Ah.

    I thought when you charge the tooth brush, you plug it into a "home", which is connected to the wall.
    I mean, I got used to electricity, but the idea of electrons flowing freely, creeps me out. (Though there are always electrons floating freely). I mean, more electrons in the electricity flow, travelling around me. I mean, we have electrons IN us already, but I mean...
    I just can't wrap my head around how it would work..
     
  15. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    ok. I see where maybe there's a communication problem in that I didn't explain myself correctly?

    Let me try again, using a toothbrush as the example.

    The base is plugged into the wall. Electricity flows from the outlet, through the cord, to the base and flows through a coil, generating an electromagnetic field. Typically you will see a "spike" from the base, protruding upwards, about 1/2 an inch.

    The toothbrush itself is sealed. You will not see any electrical contacts or charging strips like you see on say...your cellphone battery when you pull the back off the phone. Or think of any device using batteries with a physical contact point between either end of the battery, like in a flaslight. You won't find that in a toothbrush.

    What happens is the electricity flows from the outlet, through the cord, into the coil in the base, that exists in that little spike, and the charging coil in the sealed toothbursh is inserted *into* that field. That allows for a transfer of electricity, all without the electrical parts ever physically touching via contact strips. The "air gap" in this situation is very small, like maybe a few milimeters and the key is that the two coils are in such close proximity that they actually co-mingle.

    In the future, and the rumor that started this thread, they've figured out how to expand that "air gap" to about 2 meters, instead of 2 millimeters. So you're absolutely correct in that you will still have a power source "base unit" plugged into a wall socket, but you won't need a cord from that unit to say your lamp. That transfer can take place using resonant inductive charging--the same general principle that happens today with a toothbrush, but with an extra twist of physics principles to achive the longer distance separting the two coils that exchange the electricity.

    Does that help any?

    Again, I apologize for coming across as rude. I meant it as playful sarcastic and obviously missed my mark.
     
  16. sofaking

    Bronze

    Feb 27, 2012
    0
    Don't worry, I didn't get offended. I thought the brush was actually PLUGGED in, charged by conduction (A touch) at most! So basically, it would be charged by induction?
     
  17. stevetaz

    Moderator

    Sep 23, 2008
    87
    And watch the old comments.....I resemble that remark.....LOL....
     
  18. sofaking

    Bronze

    Feb 27, 2012
    0
    Wait what lol? :p
     
  19. sofaking

    Bronze

    Feb 27, 2012
    0
    What confuses me, is say the wireless charging mat, that would be conduction, but with that and say the potential wireless charging (Induction), is that these methods, charge stuff statically (static electricity), all these devices need dynamic electricity, as that's what powers circuits.

    I mean, I did my research, and stuff seems to be pointing to yes, but eh.

    I won't even be getting a new phone soon :p
     
  20. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    With the wireless charging or a toothbrush, etc... From the wall to the pad or base is conduction. From the device that's not touching physical "electrical" contacts, that's induction... Don't confuse two pieces of plastic touching (like a cell phone lying on a charging pad) (or a toothbrush sitting on a base) as conduction...that's induction.

    So any example will have both going on. Wall to power "source" and power "source" to power "receive"
     
  21. EQBob

    Gold

    Sep 24, 2007
    30
    I think we all resemble that remark <G>
     

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